Home Caribbean Jamaican Bammy Recipe – That Girl Cooks Healthy

Jamaican Bammy Recipe – That Girl Cooks Healthy

Credits to the Source Link ukpaka
That Girl Cooks Healthy

Learn how to make your own bammy from scratch. Cassava is grated, shaped into a disc and sealed in a skillet. Once sealed it is soaked in coconut milk before being frying and served with fish, vegetables or peas.

two slices of bammy with vegetables

It you have never eaten bammy before then you are in for a real treat. You only need 4 ingredients to make this delicious flatbread.

This recipe definitely holds some significant childhood memories because I grew up seeing it being made as well as purchasing it when we didn’t have time to make our own.

This cassava flatbread is one of those hidden gems of the Jamaican culture, it’s a side of the island that isn’t tapped into unless you’re somewhat connected. 

I first posted this recipe on my website several years ago, but as I evaluated the way I had originally written the recipe post. I felt as if some important components were missing and the recipe guide needed more detail along with my usual step by step pictures.

bammy with veggies and condiments

What is bammy?

By definition is a flat bread made from the cassava root, a starchy complex carbohydrate vegetable which is also known as yuca.

The cassava root is grated to a fine consistency then placed in a woven bag to be drained (very important step). Once drained the dried pulp is transferred to a ring on a flat iron or griddle on an open flame. 

From there is it flatten to be shaped and cooked leaving a disc, similar to a tortilla, only thicker.

When ready to eat the disc or quarters (if already cut) are soaked in coconut milk (some people use animal milk) then fried until golden brown and served with meat (especially fish), vegetables or legume/peas if you are vegan.

This wonderful flat bread is something that has been present in the Jamaican culture for centuries pre- Columbus times, going far back to the days of the original inhabitants – the Arawak Indians.

The vast majority of bammy is made by the rural communities and then sold in stores or to street vendors. It is also sold abroad especially to countries with a large Caribbean population (think England, US, Canada etc…)

If you want to learn more about the Caribbean then this post entitled what is caribbean food goes into tremendous details about the various ground provisions eaten by each island.

Ingredients you will need

ingredients to make bammy

Recipe revamp

One thing to note with this recipe is that I tweaked it and adjusted a few custom norms. The actual process of making bammy DOESN’T include water. You will see in the instructions that I’ve including re-hydrating the bammy with water. 

Without the water, the texture of the cassava is crumbly when forming it into a disc. I also coat the skillet in oil, again this isn’t usually done but I personally find easier to make my bammy using these adjustments.

Peel and cutting the cassava

There are two ways to doing this, you can either chop the ends off and then use a knife to lift some of the waxy peel (once you do that you can literally peel around it). Most people will just pick the crop up and peel it in their hand without a chopping board, that’s the local way of doing it

or……..

Place the cassava on a chopping board, cut the ends off and place upright (vertically) then slice off the peel downwards. Once you have peeled the cassava, you will need to slice it in half to remove the woody stalk in the centre.

How to make Jamaican bammy

steps 1-8 making the bammy

  • Grate the cassava pieces using a box grater (you want the side with the smallest holes). Alternatively, you can breakdown the cassava using a food processor instead (just make sure to chop your cassava very small). Make sure the consistency is fine, like a puree and lump free (you may need to add some water if using a processor).
  • Use a cheese or muslin cloth to squeeze out the excess liquid and discard the juice.
  • Place the cassava in a medium sized bowl and add your pink salt and work it into the entire batch of cassava using your hands to evenly distribute it.
  • Add about 1/4 cup of water to re-hydrate your cassava pulp (it should be slightly wet, not bone dry).
  • Use a pasty brush to lightly coat your skillet with oil.
  • Place your mould/ring on a skillet/tawa/crepe pan 
  • Add some of the cassava pulp to your mould ( enough so it’s about 1 inch in thickness) and use the back off a spoon to press and flatten the top (make sure the heat is off)
  • On low heat seal the first side (should take 2-3 minutes)
  • Remove the mould by lifting it, you may need to use a spoon to push down on the top as you lift.
  • Flip the bammy over to the other side (using an egg spatula).
  • Seal the other side then leave to cool on a cooling rack
  • Repeat the same process depending on the size of your bammy.
  • Once you have sealed your bammy if you do not intend to use it immediately it is very important to freeze it.

The cooking process

step 1- 4 cooking the bammy

  • When you are ready to eat your bammy (thoroughly defrost if it’s frozen)(skip if it’s fresh)
  • Cut your bammy into quarters or leave it hold if you want to.
  • Place the bammy in coconut milk to soak for about 10 minutes.
  • Remove the bammy from the coconut milk (blot off any excess milk)

Fry/Grill/Air Fry or Oven Bake

Before choosing any of the cooking methods after you have blotted of the milk off use a pastry brush to coat the bammy in oil;

  • Air Fryer: Coat/spray the basket in oil, place the bammy in the unit. Set to 180c/356F for 6-8 minutes, turning over half way
  • Pan frying: On medium heat, fry (the amount of oil you use is subjective) bammy on each side until golden
  • Grill/Broil: Grill both side of the bammy on medium heat (should take several minutes)
  • Oven: Place of parchment paper, bake for 15- 20 minutes until golden turning half way through

Storage

As mentioned earlier, if you don’t care to use your bammy straight away, you will need to freeze it straight away because cassava turns quite rancid when it’s not being used.

The best thing to do is the place your cassava bread on parchment paper (sandwich them if needed) and put them in a zip lock bag. Just be sure to defrost them prior to cooking them (very important)

Where can you buy cassava?

Head to a neighbourhood that has a high African/latino or Caribbean population. Supermarkets or markets in these neighbourboods will have them.

Can you use frozen cassava instead?

Yes, but only if it grated cassava, it won’t work with whole frozen pieces. make sure the cassava is raw/uncooked.

This is my first time using cassava, how do I know it’s good?

Good question! Your cassava will feel firm to the touch with no soft spots. If it feels soft then don’t buy it as it will be no good. It should also be an almost bright white colour, free from blemishes with no lines or discoloration.

Can I use the juice from the cassava?

NO! discard it immediately, as it is toxic in it’s raw state (not when cooked). Although Guyanese people use it to make cassereep (a dark thick liquid).

I’m not versed in this technique so I will NOT be recommending anything other than to discard the liquid which is why the pulps need to be thoroughly squeezed to rid the liquid.

Serving suggestions

 Steamed Fish  

Caribbean Stewed Fish 

Saltfish and Cabbage

Shrimp and Cabbage

Pan Fried Garlic Butter Shrimp

Escovitch Fish

Notes and tips

  • Cassava is also known by the name of yuca (Spanish name for it)
  • For best results make sure to use a mould to shape your bammy. I used an adjustable cake ring so I can customise the size the depending on what I want.
  • When sealing the bammy you will notice the top and bottom turn translucent with a white centre. This is normal because I used water to re-hydrate the bammy which isn’t traditionally done.
  • Don’t make your bammy too flat, it should ideally be about 1 inch in thickness
  • The amount of bammy you make will be subject to the size of your discs.
  • Make sure if you aren’t eating the bammy straight away to freeze it (sooooo important)

4 slices of bammy on a plate

Jamaican side dishes you may like

**Don’t forget to comment below and star rate if you have tried my recipes. Let’s be friends and engage on Facebook and Instagram I also like to pin on Pinterest, where you can find more amazing recipes.**

bammy and veggies

Jamaican Bammy Recipe

This cassava flatbread known as bammmy is a great wheat free alterative and a vital Jamaican dietary staple.

Print Pin Rate

Course: Extras

Cuisine: Jamaican

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Total Time: 35 minutes

Servings: 4 servings

Calories: 536kcal

Instructions

To make the bammy

  • Grate the cassava pieces using a box grater (you want the side with the smallest holes). Alternatively, you can breakdown the cassava using a food processor instead (just make sure to chop your cassava very small). Make sure the consistency is fine, like a puree and lump free (you may need to add some water if using a processor).

  • Use a cheese or muslin cloth to squeeze out the excess liquid and discard the juice.

  • Place the cassava in a medium sized bowl and add your pink salt and work it into the entire batch of cassava using your hands to evenly distribute it.

  • Add about 1/4 cup of water to re-hydrate your cassava pulp (it should be slightly wet, not bone dry).Use a pasty brush to lightly coat your skillet with oil.

  • Place your mould/ring on a skillet/tawa/crepe pan 

  • Add some of the cassava pulp to your mould ( enough so it’s about 1 inch in thickness) and use the back off a spoon to press and flatten the top (make sure the heat is off)

  • On low heat seal the first side (should take 2-3 minutes)

  • Remove the mould by lifting it, you may need to use a spoon to push down on the top as you lift.

  • Flip the bammy over to the other side (using an egg spatula).

  • Seal the other side then leave to cool on a cooling rack

  • Repeat the same process depending on the size of your bammy.

  • Once you have sealed your bammy if you do not intend to use it immediately it is very important to freeze it.

Cooking the bammy

  • When you are ready to eat your bammy (thoroughly defrost if it’s frozen)(skip if it’s fresh)

  • Cut your bammy into quarters or leave it hold if you want to.

  • Place the bammy in coconut milk to soak for about 10 minutes.

  • Remove the bammy from the coconut milk (blot off any excess milk)

  • Air Fryer: Coat/spray the basket in oil, place the bammy in the unit. Set to 180c/356F for 6-8 minutes, turning over half way

  • Pan frying: On medium heat, fry (the amount of oil you use is subjective) bammy on each side until golden

  • Grill/Broil: Grill both side of the bammy on medium heat (should take several minutes)

  • Oven: Place of parchment paper, bake for 15- 20 minutes until golden turning half way through

Notes

  • Cassava is also known by the name of yuca (Spanish name for it)
  • For best results make sure to use a mould to shape your bammy. I used an adjustable cake ring so I can customise the size the depending on what I want.
  • When sealing the bammy you will notice the top and bottom turn translucent with a white centre. This is normal because I used water to re-hydrate the bammy which isn’t traditionally done.
  • Don’t make your bammy too flat, it should ideally be about 1 inch in thickness
  • The amount of bammy you make will be subject to the size of your discs.
  • Make sure if you aren’t eating the bammy straight away to freeze it (sooooo important)

Nutrition

Calories: 536kcal | Carbohydrates: 88g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 20g | Saturated Fat: 12g | Sodium: 621mg | Potassium: 739mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 4g | Vitamin A: 29IU | Vitamin C: 47mg | Calcium: 46mg | Iron: 2mg

   



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